DID YOU KNOW???

                              Tambour gives birth to crochet

Research suggests that crochet probably developed most directly from Chinese needlework, a very ancient form of embroidery known in Turkey, India, Persia and North Africa, which reached Europe in the 1700s and was referred to as “tambouring,” from the French “tambour” or drum. In this technique, a background fabric is stretched taut on a frame. The working thread is held underneath the fabric. A needle with a hook is inserted downward and a loop of the working thread drawn up through the fabric. With the loop still on the hook, the hook is then inserted a little farther along and another loop of the working thread is drawn up and worked through the first loop to form a chain stitch. The tambour hooks were as thin as sewing needles, so the work must have been accomplished with very fine thread.

At the end of the 18th century, tambour evolved into what the French called “crochet in the air,” when the background fabric was discarded and the stitch worked on its own.

Crochet began turning up in Europe in the early 1800s and was given a tremendous boost by Mlle. Riego de la Branchardiere, who was best known for her ability to take old-style needle and bobbin lace designs and turn them into crochet patterns that could easily be duplicated. She published many pattern books so that millions of women could begin to copy her designs. Mlle. Riego also claimed to have invented “lace-like” crochet,” today called Irish crochet.

Retrieved from : http://www.crochet.org/?page=CrochetHistory

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Author:

They say style is eternal. This is just a try to keep it that way. Hoping to savor your style, Because let’s face it? Style is personal, style is beautiful and most of all? It’s you. Join me on my venture to discover myself. And maybe somewhere along the line, you will find yourself too. I am just a nineteen year old, #pearlacademy styling student, (trying) to be a fashion maven. Hi, I am Sameeksha Chanana and welcome to my blog.

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